Why is it So Important to Observe The International Day Of The Girl?

The main goal of the International Day Of The Girl is to increase awareness of gender inequality faced by girls worldwide based upon their gender, as well as to promoting more opportunities for girls, worldwide.

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Refugee Girl at UN Camp dressed up as a Policewoman (Her Dream Job) / Meredith Hutchinson / IRC

Being a girl is far from glamorous. In fact, if you are reading this, you are already very lucky. Statistically speaking, more female babies are aborted than male babies, and young girls have less chances of being educated than boys. In many countries, girls are not allowed to learn how to read and write at a young age.

Millions of girls are at risk of FGM (Female Genital Mutilation) which the United Nations condemned as a violation of human rights.

Even in some developing countries, transgender girls are banned from using public restrooms. And, while the legislations are meant to be a ban on transgender people as a whole –which is still terrible, by the way– they are often only enforced on transgender girls, and not transgender boys.

Girls are more likely to marry very young, in contrast to boys. One every four girls marry before the age of 18.

In many communities, girls are still forced to marry against their wishes.

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Girls can be shunned from their communities when they have their period. Many of them are forced to sleep outside since they are said to be “untouchable.”

Suicide amongst young girls (aged 15-19) continues to be the leading cause of death for young girls, world wide. The 2nd? Maternal death.

In the United States, tampons and pads are still taxed in 39 states, despite them being a necessity and not a luxury.

But if you made it through puberty, dodged getting married young, finished University and found a job, odds are that you are paid less than your male counterparts for doing the exact same thing.

In a speech, American president, Barack Obama, said: “This is the future we are forging: Where women and girls, no matter what they look like or where they are from, can live free from the fear of violence. A future where all girls know they can hold any job, run any company, and compete in any field, let us keep working to build a world that is more just and free — because nothing should stand in the way of strong girls with bold dreams.”

 

Source: The Guardian / Wikipedia

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ellie
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Journalist, psychologist, spokeswoman, photographer, human rights advocate, happy, proud, lipstick.

England, United Kingdom.

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